Tuesday, July 19, 2011

How to Tuesday: The Wrapped Binding

Small World #12
My favorite method of finishing my little fused art quilts is with the Wrapped Binding. With a Wrapped Binding you can have wavy edges on your quilt, the quilt hangs flat on the wall, and you don't have to make that stupid rod pocket to hang the quilt. All you need is a little loop on the back of your beautiful creation to hang it on a nail on the wall.

What's the secret to all that curvy, flat, loopy goodness?

Timtex!

Timtex holds the quilt and batting flat and allows you to cut curvy or even circular shaped quilts. There is one thing you have to keep in mind with this method of binding your quilts. You lose about 1" of design space around the edge of your quilt because each edge is wrapped around to the back of the quilt onto the Timtex.

Here's how to make a Wrapped Binding:

1. Cut your Timtex and batting about 1/2" smaller than each edge of your quilt top. 
2. Stack the Timtex and batting on the cutting mat and trim each edge in a wavy motion. Cut curves in and out that measure about 1/4" – 1/2" deep with a rotary cutter.   
3. Remove the release paper from your fused quilt top. 

4. Center the batting onto the back of the quilt top. Flip the batting and quilt top over holding everything in place and place on release paper.  
5. Steam set the quilt top to the batting for about 10 seconds in each spot. After it cools, remove it from the release paper.




6. Add hand embroidery stitches with size 8 or 12 pearl cotton thread and an embroidery needle just through the batting and top layer of the quilt.



7. Place the quilt top right-side down on the ironing surface. Match the Timtex shape to the batting and put in place. (Let's pretend the Timtex has wavy edges rather than straight edges.)
8. At a corner, fold the quilt top fabric onto the Timtex to form a right angle. Leave a little ease at the tip of the corner to get a sharp point. Fuse-tack the fabric just at the corner.


9. Repeat Step 8 at each corner of the quilt.
10. At a corner, fold one side of the quilt top fabric onto the Timtex. Slowly pull, wrap, and fuse-tack the quilt top to the back following the edge of the Timtex. Stop about mid-way down the edge. 
 11. At that same corner, fold the other side of the quilt top fabric onto the Timtex making a sharp point at the corner. Slowly pull, wrap, and fuse-tack the quilt top to the back following the edge of the Timtex. Stop about mid-way down the edge.


 12. Repeat Steps 10 - 11 around the perimeter of the quilt.


13. Add random acts of fusing to fill in the back of the quilt.
14. Steam set the back of the quilt for 10 seconds in each spot.
15. Machine stitch the quilt if you want.



16. Add a hanging loop to the back of the quilt. This is a little thread loop made with a chain stitch.

You are now an official graduate of the Wrapped Binding Class! Time to celebrate you new knowledge!

14 comments:

cindy said...

Ya the hanging rod went out a long time ago and takes away from the art. You did a great job. I love your little iron. Come visit soon, not much going on in the material department here but summer is always interesting in one way or another, http://besidethetrail.ca/hatsnhospitalitea/

KatieQ said...

I'll be the first to admit I'm a little slow in catching on, but when you do a wrapped binding do you have a backing fabric? I may have missed something, but it only looks like batting on the back of the quilt. I also wondered about the loop. Is that it showing on the front of the quilt?

Laura Wasilowski said...

Hi Katie,
The back is random acts of fusing where you fill in the back with all your left over fused fabrics. The loop is stitched on the back of the quilt at the top like where you would put a picture hanger.
Thanks for visiting my blog!
Laura

:Diane said...

I'm also slow... your quilt is wavy edged but you're wrapping the edge of a rectangle. Is that just a demo piece? You didn't want to demo on the real thing?

Laura Wasilowski said...

Hi Diane,
Sorry about that. Yes, I'm showing a rectangle without the wavy edges. Let's pretend it has been cut wavy.

WoolenSails said...

Great idea to bind a wavy edge, makes it fun to have an edge that is not flat all the time.

Debbie

Unknown said...

Laura,

I love your blog and thank you for your generous tutorials!

A question: is the batting a fusible? Sounds like your quilt is ironed on to it?

Thanks, Joanna

Unknown said...

Hi Laura,
I love your blog and thank you for your generous tutorials! A question: is the batting a fusible? sounds like your quilt i ironed on to it?

Thanks, Joanna

Gabriela said...

hi! I just got my Art Quilting Studio and was so happy to see your article! Your work is great and so recognizable!
LOve it, love it!

Sewconsult said...

I love the ability and the quilt-free wave of doing the wrapped binding. Wavy is good!
Beckie

Linda said...

This is good to know. Thank you!

Laura Wasilowski said...

Hi Joanna,
The batting isn't fusible. But all the fabrics I use on the quilt top have fusible web on them.
Thanks for visiting my blog!
Laura

Zizophora said...

Wow, thank you so much for showing us this! I can imagine so many benefits. I'm going to become a huge fan of Timtex!

Gloria said...

Great tutorial and technique! Thank you very much for taking time to share ti with us. I will be using this method very soon and I'm adding this page to my "favs" for reference.