Saturday, August 27, 2011

Being a Do-er Ain't Bad: Day 5

Another free form sculpture created through the miracle of junk drawer hardware!
The jewelry class with Thomas Mann taught me more than how to saw and rivet metal. It also gave me a new perspective on how I work as an artist.
When I make art quilts I'm not mindful of how I create. I just make the stuff. Free cut at piece of fabric, fuse it into place. But when working in a different material like metal, suddenly I am very aware of how I go about designing and making the art.

This is what I learned from taking this jewelry class:
  • It's hard to work in a classroom situation. With so many people bustling around it's difficult to concentrate. You can either ignore everyone else or engage fellow students and learn from them.
  • Have the right tools for the job. Without the right tools for the materials you are working with, you can't even begin to make the art work. Without saws, hammers, drills, and the handy anvil, you can't work in metal.
  • One piece of art work can lead to the next and the next. Left over shapes can inspire the next creation.
  • Everyone learns a new skill differently. Some students need written directions, or visual directions, or verbal directions or are tactile learners. 

It became obvious to me that I am a tactile learner and need to work with the materials directly. The fancy name for this is a "kinesthetic". The not so fancy name is a "do-er". Are you a do-er or one of those other people?





15 comments:

Gene Black said...

I use all three methods of learning, but I think that I learn best when it is kinesthetic. Perhaps that comes from playing piano. My fingers seem to remember what to do even when I couldn't tell you what they are doing.

Connie said...

I seem to learn best as a kinesthetic. I also find it difficult to work with a lot of people around - maybe I'm just a loner :)

Janelle said...

I too learn by doing. That is the only way that information sinks in to my brain. I get distracted when there are a bunch of people around. I want to watch them create or just chat. Some of this tendency comes from being home with kids all the time and craving adults to talk to.

Leslie McNeil of MarveLes Art Studios said...

Doer! Loved the post, appreciat the perspective! Thxs

Exuberant Color said...

I love to hear and to read the technique tips, but until I actually do them, I really don't have the whole picture. I don't do well in a classroom setting either, being a loner (or is it a hermit) and being used to letting my mind wander.

WoolenSails said...

I am not good in a class situation, I tend to get distracted and talk too much, lol.

Debbie

Gayle from MI said...

This post is one of the reasons why I think your classes go so well and everyone enjoys them. First of all are the kits. Everything you need fabric wise to have a wonderful outcome. You teach to all forms of learners. I learn by doing but I lose what I have learned unless I can reference it in written form. So your handouts are great (or books too). I have always felt sorry for folks who stick only to themselves in classes and at shows. You are limiting yourself so much. After all if I wasn't a talker I would never have met you and your fellow Chicago Fusers!

Sewconsult said...

I definitely learn by doing and am easily distracted by others around me...probably why I have gotten so much less done since hubby retired and can invade my space at any time. It took me several months to learn to accept the intrusion.
Beckie, who wonders when a homemaker actually retires.

liniecat said...

I had no idea I was kinesthetic! Thank goodness it doesnt need any medication..
I devise and make tactile learning resources for visually impaired kids in my day job, so think sideways round replicating things, as it were.
Thinking laterally they call it.
I found the job and then my creative gene properly kicked in and yes, I am SO a 'doer'.
I feel as a 'Kinesthetic' I should maybe have a badge to declare Im chuffed about it!

eily62 said...

Your comments todaya were great - gives me a lot to think about. Now I know why in a class I watch and take in - becasue it is distratcing. It is hard to keep in a place where I can work productively ...But ... when I get home becasue of what I have seen and heard - I can do.

Maggie Szafranski said...

I am a visual learner. If I can't visualize in my head what is written, then it doesn't make sense. So I need lots of pictures to help me see the lesson.

Linda said...

I am very definitely a visual and kinesthetic learner. I am also very distracted in the classroom situation. I like to play with my work and feel intimidated when others are watching.

susan said...

For learning the optimum would be to watch a demo and then go do it! So does that mean I'm a visual doer? LOL Amazing how learning one craft can connect to the other things we do!
Thanks for the post!

Lisa said...

Both! But mostly a do-er. I like to see how it's done and then I do it. I often have a hard time explaining a process to someone but I can see how it is done. It's a challenge I am overcoming with my own teaching.

Denny1600 said...

I'm a kinesthetic learner. My husband is a visual learner. He will look at something for a long time before he starts working on it. I just want to jerk it out of his hands and get to work on it!

I'm proud of you for taking the jewelry class with Thomas Mann. Every so often I think I want to make jewelry. I give it a try and make something pretty. Then it falls apart . . .

I don't usually have that problem with quilts. Let me touch it and try it and I can usually figure it out.