Monday, January 28, 2013

What's with all this fuss about removing the paper from fused fabrics before using them? Can't you just cut out fabric shapes with the paper still on it? Well, my little pumpkin there are several reasons to remove the silicone release paper from a fused fabric before using the fabric. Here they are:
Building units.
  • You want to save the paper whole in big sheets because it has so many uses like collage building, building elements as a unit, and  fused fabric storage.
  • If you cut out a shape leaving the paper on, the pull on the fabric edges as you remove the paper may fray the edges of the fabric. You want nice clean edges.
  • If you want to transfer a pattern shape to fused fabric you need the paper. Here's the directions for Pattern Transfer to a Fused Fabrics. It's worth saving the paper for this.
  • Most importantly, silicone release paper is used as protection. Place it on top of your quilt to protect it from that filthy iron that you refuse to clean.
Ah! The miracle of pattern transfer with silicone release paper.
Now get out there and save some paper!

8 comments:

Gene Black said...

And it is way easier to take off as a whole sheet! That is the best reason I know.

Aliceart said...

This was the biggest eureka moment from the class I took with you! Having all that release paper around is a huge help, and I love the way you taught me to use a pen to transfer patterns.

Cornwoman said...

Transferring pattern shapes to the pieces is my favorite thing!

WoolenSails said...

I do leave the paper on and it is a pain to get it off on small pieces, great idea to take it off first.

Debbie

Beth said...

Forgot about that. So much easier your way.

Judy McCarthy said...

Thanks Laura.I'm taking this year as my "learning to quilt year", and I already love the idea of fabric collage.Thank you for all your tips.I'll be getting your dvd and books to add to my growing collection.

Val Reaves said...

Thank you!!!

Margaret said...

Sometimes I have trouble releasing the paper without tearing it. Could it be a brand thing? I know one of the brands I use is easier to separate than the other. Any tips?